A Historic New England Farm

A Place to Grow Since 1756

A Pesticide-Free CSA

Taste the Difference. Make a Difference.

A Place to Hike or Ride

312 Acres of Open Space and 10+ Miles of  Hiking and Horseback Riding Trails

A Friend to Neighbors in Need

We Donate Six Tons of Produce Annually

More than a Farm Store

One-Stop Shopping for Local Foods & Gifts

A Key Ingredient for Top Chefs

Award-Winning Chefs Serve Holcomb Farm Produce

A Place to Celebrate

Hold Your Special Event at Holcomb Farm

SUMMER 2023 SHARES NOW ON SALE!

Enjoy nutrient-rich, delicious produce, grown locally, without chemical fertilizers or pesticides, and save money, too. Our vegetables are harvested at peak ripeness and washed for your convenience. We also offer pick-your-own vegetables, fruits, herbs, and flowers. 

Don't delay! Our Summer Shares tend to sell out quickly! Order yours soon so you don't miss out!

SUPPORT THE FRIENDS OF HOLCOMB FARM

The Friends of Holcomb Farm is a nonprofit organization, led by an all-volunteer board of directors, that oversees all the work it takes to keep this farm thriving. By joining or renewing your membership (through a gift of $25 or more), you will support the work we do. In turn, you will receive the gift of engagement and connection with this special place that has been described as the "jewel of Granby" -- Holcomb Farm.

 

Follow Our CSA

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1 day ago
Holcomb Farm

That’s our Jack Lareau!A little overdue, however, thank you to Friends of Holcomb Farm Jack Lareau who took us on a wonderful walk last Friday. Jack told us many interesting things about our Holcomb Farm property including how trees communicate and that there was a Native American encampment on the land. Jack was wonderfully patient, too, and happily let our little friends explore and play on their own, as well. Here they are pausing to make and play on a makeshift see-saw!

📸: A.F. (current parent)

#naturebathing #inquirybasedlearning #preschool #holcombfarm #westgranby #playbasededucation #playbasedlearning #childcenteredlearning #openendedlearning #fallingranby #fallinct #ittakesavillage
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That’s our Jack Lareau!

Comment on Facebook

Kids and the great outdoors are meant to be together!

We have a thank you card for him that the children made. Hopefully, he can stop by sometime to pick it up!

2 days ago
Holcomb Farm

The Simsbury Library hosted a gingerbread house contest and look at THIS! Many thanks to the artists, and to Amber Abbuhl, Deputy First Selectman in Simsbury, for letting us know.

“Simply Radishing” won first place in the adult category and was submitted by Shannon Reid and Tammy Bylund!

(Unfortunately, the show has ended for this year)
... See MoreSee Less

The Simsbury Library hosted a gingerbread house contest and look at THIS!  Many thanks to the artists, and to Amber Abbuhl, Deputy First Selectman in Simsbury, for letting us know. 

 “Simply Radishing” won first place in the adult category and was submitted by Shannon Reid and Tammy Bylund!

(Unfortunately, the show has ended for this year)

Comment on Facebook

Very nice job... I do know how long it takes to do this kinda of project.. koodoos to u....

Well sweetheart this is your auntie it's about time you learned love you

4 days ago
Holcomb Farm

We are heartbroken to report that someone has torn sprigs of winterberry from shrubs on the Holcomb Tree Trail. First off, it is illegal to remove vegetation from open space land. Second, this property is preserved land – protected from development not only for human enjoyment, but for the benefit of the plants and animals that live there. Winterberry is a native shrub that provides nectar and pollen for bees and beneficial insects in the summer and is one of the only food sources for hungry birds in the coldest months of winter.

We agree that its berries are beautiful, but please: plant a winterberry shrub in your own yard, where it will brighten your winter landscape and attract many species of birds. When visiting Holcomb Farm, or any other open space land, please take nothing but pictures. (And friends, if you see anyone helping themselves to the plants at Holcomb Farm, please notify us. Thank you.)
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We are heartbroken to report that someone has torn sprigs of winterberry from shrubs on the Holcomb Tree Trail. First off, it is illegal to remove vegetation from open space land. Second, this property is preserved land – protected from development not only for human enjoyment, but for the benefit of the plants and animals that live there. Winterberry is a native shrub that provides nectar and pollen for bees and beneficial insects in the summer and is one of the only food sources for hungry birds in the coldest months of winter. 
 
We agree that its berries are beautiful, but please: plant a winterberry shrub in your own yard, where it will brighten your winter landscape and attract many species of birds. When visiting Holcomb Farm, or any other open space land, please take nothing but pictures. (And friends, if you see anyone helping themselves to the plants at Holcomb Farm, please notify us. Thank you.)Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

I can’t recall-are there signs posted not to do this? I know there are at McLean trails. Maybe if there aren’t-we could fundraise to get signs posted at trail entrances?

Elizabeth Gaines Guidice I bought a male and female at Meadowview 2 years ago. You can find the shrub at most nurseries but I saw it at Bosco and Warner. But you will only need a female as I have a male.

Where could one find winter berry bushes to plant? And how do you know if you have female/male bushes?

The same was reported to have happened on walking trails in Simsbury. So frustrating!

My across the street neighbors have a gorgeous one and it’s huge! They let my parents take holiday photos in front of it. 💚

We are hopeful that by sharing photos here and through our recent post about the same damage in Simsbury that more people will become aware of the importance of not only leaving native plants alone, but also planting them in their yards. The more we provide for insects, birds and other wildlife in our home yards, the less of an impact this kind of damage will have. We -obviously - are upset by the disregard for plants on public property (the damage in Simsbury) and private property (Holcomb Farm), and hope these PSAs will stop people from doing it, but also see this as an opportunity to encourage people to turn their yards into native plant sanctuaries!

So sorry to see this! While it can be tempting, always respect and protect preserved and public open spaces. Most of your neighbors will share if you ask!

This is so wrong. Disrespectful to wild nature

Same in Simsbury.

You'll need to plant a Male and a Female for the Female to send out Berries.

Torn sprigs?

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